Baby Mallards by Spencer Dybdahl Riffle on Flickr.
Storno by Ernest t on Flickr.

Storno by Ernest t on Flickr.

monstra-somnia:

It’s a… Bird! by Jeffrey Sullivan on Flickr.

Steller’s Jay

monstra-somnia:

It’s a… Bird! by Jeffrey Sullivan on Flickr.

Steller’s Jay

quock-ko:

Pigeon with strong parental instinct raised up a chicken.

ninewhitebanners:

April 14th, a fuzzy baby White-Napped Crane hatched at Central Park Zoo in New York City. White-Napped Cranes are native to Mongolia.

ninewhitebanners:

April 14th, a fuzzy baby White-Napped Crane hatched at Central Park Zoo in New York City. White-Napped Cranes are native to Mongolia.

Fluffy Pheasant Chick

Eventually growing to a height of nearly 3 ½ feet feet, this newborn Malayan Great Argus pheasant chick is only a couple of inches tall at the moment. Hatched May 13 at SeaWorld San Diego, a breeding pair of Great Argus pheasants can be seen by guests on behind-the-scenes tours at the marine-life park.

Although not currently endangered, the bird is considered threatened due to declining numbers in the wild.  The chick weighed only two ounces when it hatched.

rhamphotheca:

Chickadees are cavity nesters. 
They will sometimes build their own nests from scratch, but more often will use an existing cavity - old woodpecker holes, broken tree limbs, or nestboxes. Chickadee nests are extremely soft. The female fills the cavity with mosses, fine grasses, and thin strips of soft bark, and then lines the actual cup of the nest with plant downs and mammal fur. 
Only the female incubates. The male brings her food. She will often sit quite tight on the nest; if disturbed, she will give an explosive hiss, not unlike a snake, that can be very startling if you’re not expecting it. They are early nesters, and chicks are usually present by May. (This photo, of nearly-grown Carolina Chickadee nestlings, was taken mid-May.) They remain in the nest for less than two weeks before the parents start coaxing them out by bringing food to the nest hole but no longer entering.photo by Elizabeth Sellers (AussieBotanist) on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

Chickadees are cavity nesters.

They will sometimes build their own nests from scratch, but more often will use an existing cavity - old woodpecker holes, broken tree limbs, or nestboxes. Chickadee nests are extremely soft. The female fills the cavity with mosses, fine grasses, and thin strips of soft bark, and then lines the actual cup of the nest with plant downs and mammal fur.

Only the female incubates. The male brings her food. She will often sit quite tight on the nest; if disturbed, she will give an explosive hiss, not unlike a snake, that can be very startling if you’re not expecting it. They are early nesters, and chicks are usually present by May. (This photo, of nearly-grown Carolina Chickadee nestlings, was taken mid-May.) They remain in the nest for less than two weeks before the parents start coaxing them out by bringing food to the nest hole but no longer entering.

photo by Elizabeth Sellers (AussieBotanist) on Flickr

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

birdsonly:

Chaffinch (fledgling) ~ Buchfink (Jungvogel; Ästling) ~ Fringilla coelebs
And here is the orphaned baby Chaffinch, only survivor of a clutch and found and saved last minute, who is slowly growing, developing and making progress.
2014 © Jesse Alveo

birdsonly:

Chaffinch (fledgling) ~ Buchfink (Jungvogel; Ästling) ~ Fringilla coelebs

And here is the orphaned baby Chaffinch, only survivor of a clutch and found and saved last minute, who is slowly growing, developing and making progress.

2014 © Jesse Alveo